Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Junkin' Finds: July/August 2016

In the middle of a very hot summer and a major remodeling, I haven't had that much time for perusing thrift stores or garage sales. The last couple of weeks I have found what I call interesting bits and pieces.

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I have been on the lookout for OLD picnic baskets in great condition for storage in my craft room REDO. Ha, the before pictures will be humiliating, but I promise to post them. The top basket is vintage Baskerville, from Putney, Vermont. Split Oak, these baskets usually go for $25.00-$40.00 in great condition and are no longer made in the USA. Many different styles are on the secondary market now. I snagged this one for $3.99 at GoodWill.

The bottom basket I got at a thrift store and is a Redmon picnic basket made in Peru, Indiana. These were popular in the 1930's to the 70's I believe. Very good quality and stable, they go for $12-$50 now depending on size, condition and the style woven pattern on the side. I think I have picked up maybe 5 of them over the last year, for $6.99 and under to use for craft storage.

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The next item in the vignette here is the sheer drape at the bottom---which is a netting of some sort/poly probably from the 90's...it's a scarf very long maybe 20 feet long and 60" wide with the most adorable embroidered rosebuds sprinkled across. 

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I think this will end up in my grand's bedroom at sometime--and was only $3.00 at a thrift store. This scarf washed beautifully. 

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Here's an unusual cutwork on sheer organdy in blue (hard to find) and a white chainstitch decorations. It has the look of the late 1940's or early 50's. This was in very good condition and washed out nicely. I have to press it though before I can display this. Cost-$.50.

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This is my favorite find. A wonderful very OLD ironstone pitcher. Crazed or not, I snagged this so fast before I even looked to see what the condition was. Cost---$6.99. Can you believe that, no chips or cracks--crazed but who cares, only adds to the gorgeousness of this piece.


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I could have taken a hundred pictures of this-from every angle it was just superb. It has what I call raised flourishes and curly-cues under the clear glaze. I just love it, the size is about the size of a medium washbowl set.


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Marked WARRANTEED 
over  a crowned Lion and a crowned Unicorn with shield in the middle 
Princess (pattern)
So many pottery marks are similar, best guess, attributed to Empire Pottery of Trenton NJ. This company was in business from 1863 - 1884. IThe bottom has a "Lion and Unicorn" mark and reads Princess (which I assume is the name of the pattern line), 
White graniteware or ironstone was produced by many Trenton, New Jersey potteries. The lion and unicorn was a common mark, and several companies used variations of this. Anyway I love it and it was a steal at $6.99.

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Not so old is this spatterware cheese crock, maybe as old as the 1980s. Which I love and it was $1.99. The NEW ladybug clothespins for holding a banner or whatever were $.50 and in their original packaging.

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On top of the baskets is a gorgeous old square tin. I soo love the colors in this.



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The embossed patterns are quite intricate, the tin box is in good shape and has a domed embossed double thick lid.

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I can't even guess how OLD it is, but it is marked "Container Made in England".
In excellent condition, I can't even hazard a guess at the date or who made this with no further markings. I did find one other on the Internet, but also with no information.

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This was only $1.99. I think the sticky spot to the right held a label of some sort. No doubt it was a candy box.

The weather has been too hot to do garage sales for an old lady, lol. Air-conditioned thrift store are the only way to go---or your side table in your bedroom.


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I found these seven in my sewing table of my grandmother's. And they are very Old, very fine mending threads with their original labels and an old wooden spool of purple thread.


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Not very many items for a whole month, but they are all going to be perfect 
for my bedroom, grand's room, or craftshop REDO.

All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog without my permission. Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle






Sandi



Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Whole House Remodel: Kitchen--Finally!

For those of you who have commiserated on remodels, here is where we are: the front half of the NEW kitchen floor went in pretty much without a hitch. LOVE, love, love our vinyl plank floor. The interlocking pieces look and feel like real wood, are waterproof and easily replaceable. We chose a plain wood that looks like oak and blends with our existing door frames and trim.

More on installing this type of floating flooring at this post, Vinyl Plank Floors.


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First step in the kitchen after the floor is the ceiling and tearing down the sofits. The blinds are drawn because of the heatwave. I removed all my decor, and items from all the walls, counters and shelves. Then everything was washed and stored on the table. Then I began to pack.


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and pack

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and pack

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and packed it all, from my Grandma's Monk cookie jar to the bitty bunny. 

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I can't believe I had this much on the shelves and walls.

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I had no idea what of my OLD treasured decor I will be able to use, since the soffits and shelves held so many of these items. Rather than make the decisions now---I washed everything and packed it up to wait for their REDO.

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These are the totes of all the kitchenwares plus 2 cardboard boxes and two heavy tubs under the dining table removed from the kitchen. 

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The table is in the living room now with chairs on top and storage below.

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Here, hubby removes  OLD shelf brackets. The molly-bolts were stripped, so he basically yanked them through the dry wall. I sorted through the OLD blue Mason jars, dumped some of the herbs and washed the jars. They are in cardboard boxes now and a huge tub.  


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We had a wasps' nest in the attic a few years back that had been patched. 
Here you can see the painted cardboard patch disguised behind lots of fake and real greenery.



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This room originally had Mediterranean beams on the ceiling at one time, but it chopped up the room and rough cedar caught more than it's share of ceiling cobwebs. 

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Since we are in our late sixties and do everything ourselves, we opted for lightweight bead board to cover all the existing ceiling issues instead of huge pieces of heavy drywall.  This bead board came in long strips-two boards wide and unpainted. Hubby gave the boards one coat of primer and one coat of  enamel. A final coat will be rolled on when all the installations, electrical, and moldings are on.


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Here hubby and buddy push the boards into position after gluing and then they pneumatic nailed them. This way no missed nails and hammer damage. It is very rustic though. Very country kitchen, which is what we are going for. 

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Two $69.00 scaffold units made it safe and easy to walk across for the correct height for installation of the beadboard. (We figured the right equipment was still cheaper than someone walking through the door to do the work.)

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The boys pieced around the fan-light. I'm keeping the fan because of the eating area being in the kitchen and when fourteen people are around the table, it gets hot.


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I love how the ceiling ridges echoe the fluted trim around our windows and doors. So the floor and ceiling are done to the center soffit. Eventually the wallpaper will have to go, but probably not immediately, since I have to get a feel for an all white kitchen.

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Here are some old pictures of our existing kitchen cabinets---builder-plywood grade, circa 1973 with the original Mediterranean hardware. At one time I had bought all new hardware to use but the holes were different. We did not opt to paint the cabinetry---because it's falling apart and some cleaning product in the past had messed with the finish, it's cratered, gooey and really banged up.  

That corner is a dead space...no cabinetry and wasted space. All of what is on the countertop will be able to be stored in the new swing-out corner cabinet. I will have a carousel in the upper in the corner.

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I'm hoping for some more interesting shelving for the coffee station---and some hooks for cups.
 Also looking forward to almost all drawers in the NEW cabinetry. No more standing on my head and dislocating a shoulder reaching for something.


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I'm still not settled on colors for the walls as there will be very little surface. I do like this combo here, Red, blue (of course) and a bit of yellow from the vintage towel. 


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Here's the white cabinet that fits under the windows we purchased last summer. Stock cabinetry was all too high to put under the windows as built-ins.

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We put the island in a few years back by chopping off a peninsula counter and adding butcher block countertop which I love. I have arthritic hand issues and drop things all the time, and the non-slip surface is great for someone who is klutzy, and super for baking and canning. 

My mixed stools will all get a REDO coat of some color and new seats.

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We had upgraded our appliances within the last five years, so we will stick with those. I can't live without the extra oven. Too many people eat here for just one oven. The microwave will be on a shelf in the same location with a shorter cabinet above.

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Our cabinetry is being planned to the ceiling with a crown molding at the top. The added storage space will be wonderful. The cabinet above the fridge will be full size out to the edge and perfect for trays and large baking sheets. But, where-oh-where will all my bowls go? 


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Here's the cabinetry plan. A 30"built-in pantry on the left. A hood will go over the double ovens. The plan at this time is the counters will be butcher block, and that's not shown on the island or over the dishwasher on the right. Two double glass door cabinets will hold glassware and entertaining next to the fridge, and my everyday--un-matched blue and white dishes and serving pieces on the right above the dishwasher. These will be lit and have glass shelves, and all the other cabinets will have lighting underneath.

The stainless sink on the right will have a built-in drainboard. I'm not sure what sort of light I will have above the sink, as I have to wait and see the space with the soffit gone. We have chosen school house pendant lights for over the island with maybe a hook in the middle for hanging a rack or something interesting.

So tomorrow the plumbing's getting gutted, the dishwasher moved, and the sink plumbing and a new air stack vent installed on the porch.

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This is our cabinet/sink on the back screen porch set up for a party---the sink did not have water at the time. When hubby installed a new drain and running water last week...we discovered a problem that ruined the whole works.


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Water from our sump pumps were shooting out of the sink and up into the kitchen sinks. What a mess. Ground water everywhere---and here's the aftermath. Since we need the porch for eating and cooking while the kitchen is gutted, this plumbing is the major issue right now. Hopefully in a couple days everything will be resolved.

Meanwhile my best friend from my school years is coming on August 3rd for a week for our
50th High School Reunion! That's in 7 days, good grief!

OMG, please will the Plumbing Fairy be kind. Luckily my BF and I will be gone for three days, and leaving all this mess for hubby and his buddy to deal with.

Thanks always for stopping by and I will be happy to answer any comments or questions.



All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog without my permission. Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I will be posting at these great parties:

WowUsWednesdays
Moonlight and Mason Jars


Sandi










Thursday, July 21, 2016

July Garden in the Upper Midwest

Well it has been hotter than Hades these last two weeks. Chicagoland has humidity and higher temperatures out to the west. We are about 45 miles from the Loop, just far enough from the lake to not have the benefit of Lake Michigan cooling.

WELCOME to our GREEN Garden!

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At 8 A.M.this morning it was already 80 something under a blistering sun. The only tweaking I had to do to these photos was darken some. Yes, I said darken--never had to do that before, lol.

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On the front of our garage an OLD fishing creel basket battles a lone sunflower for attention.

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At the front of the walk, my greenhouse marigolds with nursery petunias and 
something red, I don't know the name of. This container came with the house in 1984..so it's OLD and vintage at this point. Most of the vining(potato vine) and spiking plants were frozen in three frosts in late May here, and were very hard to find. 

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We have three large pots along the garage walkway with mixed flowers. 
These vines were grown from seeds and have yet to get their red/orange flowers.

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Our front yard has morning sun and afternoon shade.



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Temporary fence to corral the Grand from running into the street. Phlox and Day Lilies survive the heat and shade.

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Unaltered picture of seed zinnias. Colors are so vibrant this year.


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The Dahlias are just beginning to bloom.

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We have 6 varieties of Day Lilies, but they disappeared quickly with the heat.

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Peppermint Zinnias started from seed, can't wait until these all bloom.

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Under the maple tree, the NEW shade bed built into the stairway.

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Coral Bells, we have so many varieties of these, and I love the crimson leaves.

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New plant, hubby transplanted and threw away the labels? Shade and sun, is all I remember.

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This geranium I wintered over in the house. It exploded about the 10th of July 
and has continued to bloom and hold, despite the sun.

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Another Dahlia, these tubers came from a mixed bag from the lumberyard.

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The pond fisher girl and boy busy trying to catch something. Not much is blooming here right now but a few Black-Eyed-Susans behind.


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except under the shade of my very tall (4foot+) Phlox 
which are blooming early this year. The Clematis on the trellis is still blooming.

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No fish in the pond, but we have a new resident frog who patiently let me take his picture from about 8 inches away. He loves the lava rock for some reason.



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Dragonfly invasion.

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"Aren't you done yet with all the photos, already???"
Poor little guy, but he doesn't dive into the pond everytime we pass by now.


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To the east is our fence with flowers, lettuce (which has bolted), tomatoes, zucchini and more flowers.

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Impatiens and Pansies in an orange pot hung on the bed frame. 
The largest Marigolds haven't bloomed yet.

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My Hollyhocks are sparse right now---but the blooms are huge. One thing about hot, wet weather is the bugs. Almost everything has been nibbled on.

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Another artisan Dragonfly with white Achillea, blooming through its wire body

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The Hollyhocks are almost transparent in their delicacy.

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Colors are un-altered...amazing! These Pansies do't look real, except for the nibbles.


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My Sunflowers are starting to bloom. This is rich and dark red.

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Around the patio we have natural bug deterrents, Lemon Grass for mosquitos and 
Peppermint to repel bees. I'm going to make a huge batch of peppermint tea, maybe even some jelly.


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An old watering can filled with mini Snapdragons, Impatiens and more Pansies.

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The Fairy pond bright with morning sun on the Coleus. Mostly this area is in shade.


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Pansies have held despite the heat and also has the burgundy Coleus.

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Lemon grass swallowing the patio. I put up all the umbrellas to shade the 
plants today. We have three more days of this forecasted.

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Ivy, Caladiums and mixed Marigolds, Impatiens, and Coleus.

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The vegetable garden birdbath and a sprinkling can with geraniums. 
We've had beans, cucumbers, broccoli. We've already made a gallon of refrigerator dills.

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I got some mixed Geraniums and they turned out to be pink.



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The backstairs is almost always in shade. The metal 'thing' is waiting for some 
doodads to get hung from it.


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Back by the shed, Coral Bells, Hostas===ENORMOUS HOSTAS.
 This is the largest they have ever grown.

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Under the big tree, more Coral bells, Impatiens and ground cover.


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The heat continues to climb rapidly, it's time to go in...and on the stairs, M'Lady dozes in the comfortable shade among my houseplants that are growing-crazy outside.

How is your garden doing in the hot summer?

Thank you for sharing your time, comments, or questions. I will try and get back to you all.

All the opinions and photographs in this blog post are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog. 
Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I will be partying at these fine blogs:





Sandi