Thursday, June 1, 2017

Ode to Iris



MY IRIS have BLOOMED! 

The cool wet weather, apparently was ideal for  Iris. The blooms are huge and abundant. 
The history of Iris meanings include Faith, Hope, and Wisdom.

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Cultivated all over the world, Iris are found in Europe, Middle East, Africa, Asia and North America.

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There are over two-hundred varieties of Iris, in all colors. The Iris takes it's name from the Greek word for "rainbow", so apropos, when Iris come in so many colors.


Dark purple Iris can denote royalty---with that rich velvety purple.

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Yellow Iris can denote passion---I guess this one represents royal passion. Iris have also been used for perfumes and medicinal purposes.


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Iris were linked to royalty, and the Fleur de Lis of France is an idealized representation of the flower. I love this striated bright purple and white.

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In any color they are gorgeous. This rust is particularly rich. 
Mine have burst into bloom in the last three days of real sunshine.

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Iris have also been linked to courage and determination. The lime-yellow Barberry is a wonderful contrast.

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The foliage is particularly strong this year. But the stems have leaned over on many because of the water content of the flowers and so many blooms. These happily reside in vases in the house.

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Peach Iris, who knew---these look like petticoats with their ruffly deliciousness.

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The Ancient Greeks' Goddess Iris, was the messenger of the gods and acted as a link from heaven to earth. Purple Iris were planted on graves of women to summon the Goddess to guide the dead in their journey to the heavens.

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My friend E's Iris at the end of her street. The dew dripping on the petals.
Ancient Egypt also marveled at the exotic blooms. Drawings of Iris have been found in a number of ancient Egyptian palaces.

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And there are more---waiting in the wings, I can't wait to see what colors these are.

Information above gleaned from this source.
http://www.proflowers.com/blog/history-and-meaning-of-iris

Another source of the symbolism of the Iris, https://symbolsproject.eu/explore/plants-and-vegetations/iris-/-lily-/-fleur-de-lys.aspx

Some of my Iris were from Breck's and planted two years ago. We chose Iris (some are twice bloomers) for their flowers and their foliage. The spiky lime leaves go well in our landscape. Here is a selection of Breck's Iris shipping in Fall, HERE.

I receive no reimbursement or products, this is simply the flowers we chose from personal experience.

Thanks always for visiting. 
I will try and respond to every comment and answer every question.

All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions, posts or any products shown or anywhere I shop.
 Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog without my permission. 
Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I will be sharing at these fine Parties!



Sandi




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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Chicagoland Spring Garden


I'm certainly not sorry to say good-bye to May, here in Chicagoland. 

May was cold, wet, cloudy, crabby, with a rare chance of sun. 
The ground was so saturated, hubby had a hard time getting anything tilled until this last week.

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This is what our garden normally looks like by the middle of May.
Everything neatly planted and mulched.
This was pretty much why I didn't post much in May---toooooo depressing.


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Instead our started plants were hunkered down in two green houses.

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 We burned up two heaters this year, sigh. 

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A rare day without rain, so we tried to transplant plants to bigger containers. 
I think we had hail the next day.

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The extra greenhouse was for seedlings and was crushed a few days later from bad weather
Those are all our tomatoes, on the table seats straight ahead. The small green house on the right was ripped up, and now the plants were too tall for the big green house. CRAZY!


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Then we began our garden demolition. Carpenter bees, and age had done a number on our lattice, rails, fencing and walkways. Our white lattice was remnants of my antique/craft shop I had for 10 years, and we used this in the garden for 10 years, so I guess we have been GREEN and did well with that as a REDO. 


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Hubby began the long process of dismantling. 
Our neighbor loaned us a huge truck jack, and we jacked up the beams that were buried. We are still doing a REDO with them, for the base of the new green house. 
Meanwhile, the entire yard was a disaster.

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Slowly, hubby stacked the usable pieces. We finally were able to burn a few nasty ones.
We will still use the plastic lattice for beans, pumpkins, and squash vines. 

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The Grand wasn't the least bit deterred from digging in her sandbox.

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I planted lemon grass in our pots for mosquito repellent. It's amazing how large it grows and is 
great for soups and Oriental dishes. I add my annuals for color.
I gave up planting annuals in the ground a few years ago, and keep to very few here and there. 
It is much easier to move pots around with color, where you need it.


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We kept some areas clear. One of the rare pictures of the grand and not of her butt, she is so fast.
 Most pictures have her half out of the frame.


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A lucky photo with the Grand in the middle of the frame. 

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In the middle of our yard the clematis finally started to bloom last weekend. 
A few birdhouses have had to been relocated.  Both of these had birds in them.

I never got pictures of any tulips. Hail and wind damage, and they were wiped out.

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This was the poor daffy's smashed to the ground from heavy rains. 

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We are working hard now, everyday. No rain forecasted until the weekend.
Stay tuned for the new garden reveal when we get it all planted. When ever that is. 
Our tomato plants are now two feet high and have out grown the greenhouses. 
They are vamping on the patio---waiting to grow--maybe tomorrow, 
if it doesn't rain, snow, or hail...LOL

Happy Spring from Chicagoland.


Thanks always for visiting. 
I will try and respond to every comment and answer every question.

All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions, posts or any products shown or anywhere I shop.
 Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog without my permission. 
Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I will be sharing at these fine Parties!


Sandi




Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Junkin' Finds May 2017



Hi, I hope everyone had a great weekend. We finally had some decent weather. 
In the spirit of OLD,NEW,GREEN, REDO..I thought I would share May's finds. 



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May-the month- was crappy weather-wise to do anything in Chicagoland this spring. I did go out at least once a week for retail/thrift therapy. I found a few things to share.


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This Royal Kent salad plate the design is  ROK32, 
not a very picturesque pattern description for such a lovely plate.
It is heavy porcelain and has a rich gold banding.


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I couldn't find a specific date on this, but, I will say within the last 25 years. Replacements had none available, so I'm guessing collectors that have these are holding on, lol. And these may have been companion pieces for gold rimmed dinnerware.


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My heart went pity-pat, when i saw this gorgeous tile. 
Most often you find these tiles chipped. This one was perfect so I snagged it. 
Two windmills, I thought I hit the jackpot.

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The mark is very faint on this---stamped Delft Blauw hand-painted, probably the artist, then something in Holland. I really don't care I just love these when they are in perfect condition --cheap. 
Like 99 cents.


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Cute little mini tin, looks like a dollhouse.


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Wonder where this will go---? Maybe to the DIY Barbie House?




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A couple of unusual hand painted porcelain desert plates.

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The colors a rich on these and the design is very fluid. 

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The center mark is known as "Cherry Blossom" made from the shape of five "M"'s and was subcontracted by the Nippon Toki Kasha Company (Noritake) to many (hundreds) of independent porcelain manufacturers who designed and made porcelain exports for the USA market. Many variations of this mark make it hard to pin down.  Style wise I date this from the early 1920's to the 1930's. They are in beautiful condition. 




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Very cool creamer---this is the perfect size for a half pint of cream.

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DIY Vintage Chic

The lid has that mid century vibe.  I was anxious to find out more and the mark style is from 1935-40's. The gold edging is a bit worn, and there is a faint crack on the handle of the lid, and a chip on the bottom. None of this will really effect the use.

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The mark is for TST Latona made by Taylor, Smith & Taylor. A division of Noritake, this was made by TST located in Chester, West Virginia. In operation from the early 1900's until 1982, TST produced all types of china for sale in five and dimes to fine department stores. 

You can see the tan/buff clay---typical of the Ohio valley coming through the white glaze dip. The design was then applied after the first/second firing. This is why an unusually shaped item might be available in multiple patterns.
It's a cute piece and I picked it up for a gift for a friend.


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I had to pick up this child's porcelain teacup. Almost reminiscent of Moriage---it has gold outlining with the painting within the gold.

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It's perfect condition and is so dainty. Perfect for the grand's tea parties and only 50 cents.

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Marked simply MADE IN JAPAN. You can go down the research 'Rabbit Hole' looking for this. 
I will go out on a limb and say this was pre WWII. Maybe it could be quite older.

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This platter was an inexpensive buy---honestly $1.99 and it's perfect. I bought this platter for daily use. When we have impromptu family meals, sorta formal, but not, I use my mix and match blue and white-anything goes---dishes. And this platter was perfect.

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Transferware has intricate designs and has been produced since the mid 1850's. 
This is the "Countryside" pattern. I love the detail and designs on this pattern, and have quite a few pieces over the years.

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While not antique this definitely qualifies as vintage. This pattern, "Countryside" was made between the years of 1966-68. I remember hemming and hawing on picking my everyday dishes for our wedding and this pattern was in the running. 

Enoch Wedgwood was a cousin of Josiah Wedgwood and they ran two separate companies. Originally in 1835 Enoch ---had Wedgwood & Co and then it  was renamed Enoch Wedgwood (Tunstall) Ltd in 1965. In 1980 it was taken over by Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, who renamed it Unicorn Pottery. So what was ---two separate Wedgwood companies actually did become one, sort of. 




Because these Spode transferware plates are reproductions, I never have a problem using them for everyday and they can be picked up for very little cost now.


All the information is on the back. I'm just glad, 
I haven't spent a small fortune
 on the Spode originals over the years.


This sweet little child's plate was so cheap---and it's perfect done in heavy weight ironstone.


A fun and informative article on the Salem China Co., is available on 

These divided plates go for very little, under $10.00, but I can remember using one at my parent's cottage for my boys and heated up---they were perfect for serving little ones and too heavy for them to pick up and throw. Plastic kid's ware used today aren't  my favorites. 

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Not a lot to show for a whole month---
I know I picked up lots of odd things that ended up in the Barbie posts too. 
Hope your picking and junkin' has been great. 


Thanks always for visiting. 
I will try and respond to every comment and answer every question.

All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions, posts or any products shown or anywhere I shop.
 Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog without my permission. 
Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I will be sharing at these fine Parties!







Sandi