Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Junkin' Finds May 2016

Since our house is slowly being put back together from the new floors and the continued plans to move on to the kitchen, I have been only junkin' here and there. 
Here is a sampling of what I found in May 2016.


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My steal of the month, 4 gorgeous plates I originally bought to resell because they were perfect. Set of 4 for $5.99. When I got them home they are two shades darker than the bedroom walls...so they are a keeper at this point.

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I totally loved all the raised white pattern on these "Rhapsody" luncheon plates by George Jones & Sons, England. The mark on the back suggests these pieces were made sometime in-between 1891-1921. The mark, which is in black, includes "England" not "Made in England" which was a requirement in 1921. They were made in plain white, black background, yellow, and green. I really couldn't find any made in blue???


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Lovely ironstone transfer ware pitcher. Medium size about 8-9" in the Aesthetic  style popular at the turn of the the 19th century.


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There were at least three USA "Ironstone" makers using this Royal Ironstone china and Warranted marking. One was the Weheeling Pottery of West Virginia circa 1880-1886, while another was Steubenville in Ohio, around 1900 and another the East End Pottery co in East Liverpool, Ohio using the mark from 1894 to 1907. These bedroom wares were mass produced and sold through catalogs also.


Cache pot with lid, tiniest ding on the inside of the rim...but a lovely piece, no mark, but very close to the same style as the pitcher. I paid less than $5 for each piece. There was a sale at the thrift store that day.



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Porcelain dish with 'moriage' applied decoration marked Japan--stylistically would figure this for the 1930-40s but post 1921 from the 'Japan' mark. This piece has design elements of Nippon but should not be confused with that. I paid a pittance for this piece in a thrift store.

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This is an unusually shaped porcelain plate...with some gold application over the brown tone transfer design with gilding. The mark is half missing and is unclear...a little sleuthing and this is Victoria pattern probably by Hanley circa 1890-1900. Just was a very pretty dish I paid 99 cents for, will keep maybe.

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Part of the mark is missing, the pattern is Victoria and England



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 A bag of game pieces for 25 cents, a soap dish, marked Germany in starburst oval, and one of my favorites, a bowl with a chip---Indian Tree---which I will use for mosaics.

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Funky chrome tray---going to be used for a bird feeder, 99cents on top of a rattan storage/picnic basket, I plan to use in the craft room for $3.99.


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This is a magazine rack for on the wall, elaborately cutout and engraved wood and the original finish. Probably circa 1880-90. I think it will look adorable painted and used for towels. This piece was $6.00

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More storage pieces---I'm planning a redo of the craft room (hellhole) in the basement and have been collecting vintage storage anything to utilize. Basket was $6.00 and in primo condition, tins are always under $1.00.

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Grandma's pretend stash continues to grow---a cute purse for the grand with a bamboo handle, 99cents. She loves purses and is getting quite a collection at Grandma's house for dress-up. The little bird dish I have had for awhile, has a ding in it, but the Grand thinks it's special.

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Can't help but pick up vintage Barbie anything in good condition. The grand used this to pack up Grandmas' Barbie and Ken for a trip to see Great-grandma in Wisconsin. It worked like a charm and the new picture on the front was  a hit.

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Circa 2002 Barbie case...inside needed nothing to be functional, held three dolls and their entire weekends wardrobe. Perfect for a 4 hour car ride.

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Not my style---but in such good condition I couldn't pass it up---a master jewelry box circa 1950-60's for $5.00 with some jewelry in it. I see a redo in it's future---and will probably use this for storage and for a show---if I every do one again.


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I know this isn't vintage...but the hysterical photo on both sides is a STITCH, fully dressed/suits English sunbathers from the 1940-50's. And it is such a great purse with leather handles,  its labeled inside and out Anya Hindmarch, London. I paid $3.00, similar bags on secondary markets are listed for $150-$450 dollars...who knew? Apparently Anya is hot stuff in the 'Label' market. I may have to consider a resell on this item.



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Two sweet pins, the enameled bird $4.00 and the black white cloisonné at $1.00


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Not the right I picked up two lengths of unused rayon/barkcloth lightweight in this charming Oriental print on a natural background. I can't help but think of Anna and the King of Siam first a book, play and then the musical, King and I.  the two pieces are perfect---$3.00 each.



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The lace piece is the finest of linen with such beautiful work done in open cutouts. This is a squared piece perfect for a tea table. It will have to be ironed, but I think I can find my board. $2.00.


I really love the corners.

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And last 5 assorted larger than placemat sized crocheted pieces, in the rayon silky thread---in ivory, white and ecru. These were all perfect and unstained, an $.25 cents each.

So tucked away for projects-- these are my finds for May---Happy hunting! And as always, I appreciate your comments and questions.


All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog. Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle









Sandi



Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Sunday Morning Coffee


We had terrible storms on Saturday again, so next morning early---between 4-5am I went outside to survey the damage. I dumped out all the excess water from the flower pots. We had no major wind, just extremely heavy downpours.



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Seeing the casualties were our Iris beaten down to the ground full of blooms and buds, I cut the broken stems and had quite a bundle of flowers. Not much else was blooming except some purple columbine and some wild flowers (Dames Rocket--or money plant) in the back yard. 
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The Iris had already twisted up and I wrangled them into a bouquet and used my granny's  enameled coffeepot for a vase. Adding some long lime green Barberry stems helped to relieve the purple for a color accent. The bushes  needed to be trimmed anyway.

The sun came quickly around the corner full blast, so I brought them inside and readjusted the blooms.



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Placed on the table. 

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It is seldom that I'm up before my husband. He turns the television on first thing. This morning was silence. I just sat and enjoyed the eastern sun on the blooms and the peace and quiet.

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As the morning light grew more intense the colors changed. The green of the Barberry took on a chartreuse hue, the purples lightened, some to lavender.

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 I grabbed the camera and took more pictures in the changing light while my coffee and muffins got cold.

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I thought of Monet and his many sketches and paintings of the same subjects in different light at different times of day.

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Now, it so easy a to push a button of an automatic camera and we capture life as it happens, even the wrinkles on my tablecloth, I'm allergic to ironing, but love the soft vintage textures of old linens.

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The darkness of the background, the patterns in the tablecloth and cup, the shine of the enamel all are a slice of life.
The muffins are Oatmeal Pumpkin Cranberry Walnut with flaxseed, super healthy and tasty. 

My basic recipe is Pumpkin Apple Muffins to which I tweaked and added more nuts and cranberries and applesauce instead of apples. They freeze well and are very healthy.




And the light changed again....as each moment of life does. Each day that passes is different, if we only take the time to see.


Thanks always for stopping by, I appreciate all your comments and suggestions and will try to answer all. 

All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog. Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle

I'll be sharing at these fine parties: 




Sandi

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Memorial Day 2016




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As we picnic, watch a parade, get sunburned, swim or have fun, let us remember those who served in our armed services to preserve our freedoms.

My Dad was just eighteen when he joined the US Army in early 1941 and was assigned to the 135th Medical Regiment. Already War was raging in Europe but it was still the great Depression in the US. He graduated early in 1941 from high school and then enlisted.

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Trying to look older? 


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With his little sister summer of 1941 before off to training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi.

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He sent his parents this really strange pillow cover with scenes of tents, eagles, flags, marching men and roses from Camp Shelby Mississippi

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My dad at 19 in the Army at Ft. Shelby, Mississippi



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Originally the 135th was made of entirely Wisconsin men, later men from other states were added.
Eventually the 135th Medical Regiment was made up of over 1500 men and women.


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Scan of a photo I have in my possession, photographer Spencer Wyckoff, Detroit Michigan. Practicing for war in June 1941. My dad talked little about the war, but they constructed this camp from the ground up. 

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My dad in the middle, all he ever said was he was in the Philippines, New Guinea and finally assigned to a  field hospital in Australia. 


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Blown up grainy original photo from a brownie camera, size 2 1/2" x 2 1/2" transport plane arrived in Philippines or New Guinea, not sure. 


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Airstrip for planes, that's mud to the side there.


Taking the area over from the enemy, New Guinea he thought when asked. Nothing was written on the pictures he took. And the field hospital below. I dug these pictures out in 2010, from moldy albums where they had been buried in boxes in the basement. 




Vintage Postcard

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Out in the bush---my dad's hospital unit. 

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Medical units were targets but seldom saw attacking action. That's my Dad third from the left, kinda out of uniform. He said it was blistering hot there.They have a 'captured' Japanese flag. 

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From New Guinea they moved to Australia and set up operations to take care of the more seriously wounded for the last two years of the war.  Dad worked in care units, sanitary units, and wounded transportation. He often road the railroads moving wounded from one hospital to another. 

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Another pillow cover in wool from Australia for his parents. I had no idea there were skiing Koalas anywhere in Australia. 

Early in 1944 with a recurring case of malaria, my Dad worked a hospital transport liner across the Pacific to the USA. He said he worked the "E" ward, or the mental unit.  He never said more than that, but another soldier's account stated a 'patient' jumped from the ship and was lost before they landed in San Francisco. I plan to find records of exactly where he was and the places he was assigned to for my boys.

My Dad never shared any details with any of us. I had to pry the little bit I could out of him. I do remember Dad having malaria attacks in the early 1950's. So many soldiers came home suffering various diseases from their service in the Pacific.




My parents, high school sweethearts were married in December 1945 in Amarillo, Texas. Dad was still in the Army and they moved to Long Island, N.Y. until he was mustered out.This is the boarding house they stayed in in Amarillo. The other couple also married and lived 10 miles from my parents' home in Wisconsin.


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In November of 2010,  Dad and Uncle Bud who served in Europe,  made an Honor Flight to Washington, D.C..
This is the WWII Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background.




With a volunteer assigned to each veteran, the plane took off from Milwaukee, Wisconsin at 5 a.m. Many of the volunteers were and are veterans themselves and pay their own way. The gentleman in the red jackets served two tours in Vietnam and was my dad's volunteer escort.




My Dad was ready to go off on his day long trip---touring the monuments, Arlington Cemetery, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the WWII Memorial. No easy feat to load over a hundred aging veterans on and off a plane and tour our capital.

 But, the best part of the day--was the parade, bands, honor guard, acres of family members, flags, balloons and signs greeting them at the airport when they returned late that night.


There were no parades in 1944-5 when they trickled home. 
My dad had tears in his eyes...and always said it was the most important thing he ever experienced. 
He passed in 2012 and is buried with my mother in the Southeastern Wisconsin Veterans Cemetery in Union Grove, Wisconsin. 

Thank-you Dad and all the other Dads, Mothers, sisters, brothers, sons, daughters who have served.

And so we HONOR the DEAD and the LIVING who served our country, 
on

MEMORIAL DAY

less we ever forget OUR FREEDOMS come at a cost. 

Please donate to your local Stars and Stripes Honor Flights and give a veteran a thank-you trip and a deserved welcome home!

Thanks so much for visiting and I will be happy to answer any comments or questions.


All the opinions and photographs in this blog are my own, I have not been paid or reimbursed in anyway for my opinions or posts. Please do not use photos without linking back to this blog. Thank you for your cooperation, Sandi Magle



Sandi